What if You Could Change Your Attachment Style?

In my top 40 recommended psychology books, I put the 2012 title, ‘Attached: The New Science of Adult Attachment, and How It Can Help You Find — and Keep — Love’ by Amir Levine and Rachel Heller in there; thanks to its Amazon.com star rating of 4.6/5. Attachment styles research is an area that I’ve been fascinated in sinceContinue reading “What if You Could Change Your Attachment Style?”

The 5 Lessons I Discovered From Being Kind

On January 1st, 2018 we kickstarted our Deliberately Better movement. Along with other passionate and driven allied health professionals, we aimed to highlight the various ways that people can choose to act if they wish to scientifically improve their health and well-being. In January, we aimed to engage in a random act of kindness each day.Continue reading “The 5 Lessons I Discovered From Being Kind”

Can You Improve Your Sleep By Going to a Sleep Retreat?

Just the other week, I was featured in the Daily Telegraph and the Herald Sun on sleep retreats. It was weird because I had been planning on running some sleep retreats but hadn’t yet. Stranger still, I hadn’t told anyone about my idea yet, and it was the first article that I have been mentionedContinue reading “Can You Improve Your Sleep By Going to a Sleep Retreat?”

Are You Living the Life That You Want?

In 2016, I decided to take on the challenge of accountability. As a Clinical Psychologist, being accountable was all about evidence-based living — engaging as much as possible in thinking patterns and behaviours that have been shown to lead to a happier, more satisfying, higher quality of life. The following were the five key areas that IContinue reading “Are You Living the Life That You Want?”

Is It Possible to Change Your Personality?

One of the benefits of being so interested in psychology is that I have performed nearly every psychology test on myself since beginning my Clinical Psychology Doctorate in 2010. This has undoubtedly given me many insights into myself, but it has also given me the skills and knowledge to help others find out a lotContinue reading “Is It Possible to Change Your Personality?”

Isolation and Loneliness: Which One Is More Damaging to Our Long-term Health?

Just the other day, I was having a debate with a client about isolation versus loneliness. He believed that the amount of social contact with others was a more significant predictor of well-being, whereas I thought how close we felt was more important for long-term health and happiness. In other words, he thought that theContinue reading “Isolation and Loneliness: Which One Is More Damaging to Our Long-term Health?”

Can Our Key Character Strengths Change Over Time?

I have previously written about how happiness can be sought and fostered by discovering our natural character strengths and virtues. The current article intends to see if these strengths remain consistent over time or if you can actively change them. Is our character set in stone, or are we malleable enough to shape our strengthsContinue reading “Can Our Key Character Strengths Change Over Time?”

What Life Traps Do You Consistently Fall Into?

Do you want to reinvent your life? In my top 20 psychology books countdown, I put the book Reinventing Your Life: The Breakthrough Program to End Negative Behavior and Feel Great Again by Jeffrey Young and Janet Klosko (1994) at #10 on my countdown. It is a self-help version of Schema Therapy, which Jeffrey Young alsoContinue reading “What Life Traps Do You Consistently Fall Into?”

The 10 Best Laws of Power

A fascinating book that I read towards the end of 2017 was ‘The 48 Laws of Power’ by Robert Greene. Since the book was first released in 1998, it has sold over 2 million copies worldwide and has influenced many successful people, from Will Smith to Kanye West, Jay-Z and 50 Cent, who later co-wroteContinue reading “The 10 Best Laws of Power”

Is Your Screen Time Eating Up Your Free Time?

How Did We Get Here? In the classic Sociology book ‘Bowling Alone’, Robert Putnam makes the compelling argument that social capital (reciprocal connections among people) has been in a steady decline ever since its peak in 1964. By 2000, the average American was 58% less likely to attend a club meeting than an individual onlyContinue reading “Is Your Screen Time Eating Up Your Free Time?”